Author Topic: How is your Festool dust extractor produced?  (Read 2583 times)

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Online Cheese

  • Posts: 8456
How is your Festool dust extractor produced?
« on: April 02, 2020, 10:38 AM »
Ran across this article...rather interesting.

Especially note that there is now a separate fuse for the power tool socket on dust extractors, a requirement that all manufacturers have to comply with by the end of 2019.

https://www.festool.com.au/knowledge/news/producing-your-festool-dust-extractor

Here's a photo of the Spray Arch Test.


Offline Gregor

  • Posts: 1750
Re: How is your Festool dust extractor produced?
« Reply #1 on: April 02, 2020, 11:28 AM »
Especially note that there is now a separate fuse for the power tool socket on dust extractors, a requirement that all manufacturers have to comply with by the end of 2019.
And, as the manual has nothing about the existence of such a fuse, the new MIDI doesn't comply?

Online Cheese

  • Posts: 8456
Re: How is your Festool dust extractor produced?
« Reply #2 on: April 03, 2020, 10:29 AM »
And, as the manual has nothing about the existence of such a fuse, the new MIDI doesn't comply?

Unfortunately, the only MIDI manual on the Festool USA website is for the earlier version.  [sad]  That was 3 generations ago... [sad]

I just thought it was interesting that if someone plugs a tool into the new vacuums and the tool doesn't work, the first thing they'd do is to check the tool, then check the vac.

Unless there is a sign/note/arrow on the vac, who's to know that there's an internal fuse that needs to be replaced? Especially if they pull down the MIDI manual off the Festool website and there's no mention of it there either.  [crying]
« Last Edit: April 03, 2020, 11:07 AM by Cheese »

Offline Gregor

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Re: How is your Festool dust extractor produced?
« Reply #3 on: April 03, 2020, 07:53 PM »
Unfortunately, the only MIDI manual on the Festool USA website is for the earlier version.  [sad]  That was 3 generations ago... [sad]
Manual on the german site is current - and lacks any mention of a fuse.

One also shouldn't forget that these 'standards' are written by industry employees. Some claim that this is done to have good and safe technology... others suspect, as eg, the DIN standards here are sold at a completely perverted price point and at time contain regulations (like the 'hand operated power pools are not allowed to be mounted for stationary use' that killed the CMS) which effectively stifle innovation... that the goal isn't to benefit mankind but only a small subset of it. So one could argue that whenever these 'standards' are mentioned... we're somewhere in BS territory anyway.

Offline Jiggy Joiner

  • Posts: 1111
Re: How is your Festool dust extractor produced?
« Reply #4 on: April 03, 2020, 09:48 PM »
In the UK, the mains plug of any 240v machine usually carries a fuse.
So the individual tool plugged into the extractor will carry a fuse at it’s 240v plug. Also the extractor mains plug, in 240v will also carry a fuse. So both machines are fused.
In the case of our 110volt tools, the plug won’t usually carry a fuse but, the 110v transformers/reducers they plug into, will again have a 240v mains plug which carries a fuse.
The 110v transformers also have a resettable trip fitted.
Sometimes our 110v tools might have an onboard fuse too.

So even without onboard fuses, our extractors carry fuses at the plug.
When I get time, I’ll check our older and newer extractors, to try and find out if they carry some kind of onboard fuse, or trip system. I’m no electrician but, I’d imagine the plugs being fused is enough?