Author Topic: MS Excel and Fractional Calculations  (Read 3002 times)

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Offline rmhinden

  • Posts: 482
MS Excel and Fractional Calculations
« on: March 28, 2020, 10:06 PM »
I had to cut some long shims for drawer slides in a cabinet I build a while ago where the center partition wasn't centered correctly.   Don't ask....

I measured the width of the cabinet at the front and back, subtracted 1" for the slides, and subtracted the width of the drawer, and then added in the width of the saw blade I was to using to cut the shim.   Doing fractional calculations by hand is a pain and error prone.

I discovered that it's very easy to do this in MS Excel.   Basically just enter the numbers and fractions (e.g., 16 15/16) and do normal calculations.    Here is an example:



I had no idea this was possible, so it was helpful to me.  Hope someone else finds this useful

Bob

p.s. Probably easier if I had done it in metric in the first place :-)

Offline usernumber1

  • Posts: 181
Re: MS Excel and Fractional Calculations
« Reply #1 on: March 28, 2020, 11:20 PM »
imperial blessings to you as well

if you dont have excel or are on mobile, use https://www.wolframalpha.com/
 

Offline Chris Wong

  • Festool Dealer
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  • Posts: 946
  • I make things that challenge me.
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Re: MS Excel and Fractional Calculations
« Reply #2 on: April 01, 2020, 01:25 AM »
Cool! That’s one of the things I love about Rhinoceros 3D - I can type in fractions, decimal inches or millimeters.
Chris Wong, http://FlairWoodworks.com
First Festool was a free pencil.
Shipping live-edge cribbage boards around the world since 2010.

Offline Sparktrician

  • Posts: 4187
Re: MS Excel and Fractional Calculations
« Reply #3 on: April 01, 2020, 08:34 AM »
LibreOffice Calc, an open-source equivalent to Excel does the same thing, but as an example, if you put in 14 5/8, it becomes 14 20/32 or whichever fractional base is selected when one formats the cells.  It does not reduce the fractions the way Excel does. 
- Willy -

  "Show us a man who never makes a mistake and we will show a man who never makes anything. 
  The capacity for occasional blundering is inseparable from the capacity to bring things to pass."

 - Herman Lincoln Wayland (1830-1898)

Offline Rich M.

  • Posts: 11
Re: MS Excel and Fractional Calculations
« Reply #4 on: December 09, 2020, 11:18 PM »
@rmhinden  - thanks very much, I didn't know that was in Excel, so I tried it & sure enough!  On the Home tab ribbon, there is a [Fraction] number format which I never noticed.  Old dog learns new trick, thx again...

Offline Bugsysiegals

  • Posts: 823
Re: MS Excel and Fractional Calculations
« Reply #5 on: December 10, 2020, 07:11 AM »
+1 for Metric.  ;)

Offline rst

  • Posts: 2684
Re: MS Excel and Fractional Calculations
« Reply #6 on: December 10, 2020, 07:32 AM »
I've been using Calculated Industries devices for 20+ years I have two desktop and a toolbelt version.  I will convert fractions, imperial decimals and metric back and forth seamlessly.  I still have one of their original models that works but my older eyes much prefer the newer larger formats.  The toolbelt stays in my van, a desktop in my house office and another in my shop.  I consider them priceless.

Offline Sparktrician

  • Posts: 4187
Re: MS Excel and Fractional Calculations
« Reply #7 on: December 10, 2020, 05:27 PM »
I've been using Calculated Industries devices for 20+ years I have two desktop and a toolbelt version.  I will convert fractions, imperial decimals and metric back and forth seamlessly.  I still have one of their original models that works but my older eyes much prefer the newer larger formats.  The toolbelt stays in my van, a desktop in my house office and another in my shop.  I consider them priceless.

I use BuildCalc on my phone and tablet.  It's a software clone of the Calculated Industries Construction Master calculators, and is excellent.   [smile]
- Willy -

  "Show us a man who never makes a mistake and we will show a man who never makes anything. 
  The capacity for occasional blundering is inseparable from the capacity to bring things to pass."

 - Herman Lincoln Wayland (1830-1898)