Author Topic: Quality feet for cutting boards  (Read 4152 times)

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Offline JonathanJung

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Quality feet for cutting boards
« on: June 17, 2021, 02:32 PM »
For classy charcuterie boards and cutting boards with a high quality fit & finish, I'm needing feet to hold them off the counter. These have been pretty good all around, but they have some markings from the molds:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07RYCRYY3/ref=ox_sc_saved_title_1?smid=A26C6DGWA2FVFP&th=1

Also I'd like to buy in bulk. Any ideas where to go?


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Offline Cheese

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Re: Quality feet for cutting boards
« Reply #1 on: June 17, 2021, 05:42 PM »
I like Uxcell clear silicone bumpers, they fit snugly in a 5 mm hole. They're small, easily hidden with no fasteners to rust.

I purchase them in bags of 100 but I've seen quantities of 1000 also sold. 


Offline Crazyraceguy

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Re: Quality feet for cutting boards
« Reply #2 on: June 17, 2021, 06:58 PM »
There is a guy in Vermont at a company called High Falls Furniture. He has a Youtube channel and a website called Cuttingboardfeet.com. He has lots of choices, colors, sizes, etc.
I'm not affiliated in any way, just been watching him for years.
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Offline Cheese

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Re: Quality feet for cutting boards
« Reply #3 on: June 17, 2021, 07:57 PM »
Another thought for those silicone feet I mentioned, I'd consider counterboring them into the bottom of the board so that they're proud of the surface by only 1-2 mm. I think they'd kind of disappear, they're certainly less obvious than black feet with stainless fasteners.  [big grin]

Offline Bob D.

  • Posts: 2186
Re: Quality feet for cutting boards
« Reply #4 on: June 17, 2021, 10:07 PM »
Another thought for those silicone feet I mentioned, I'd consider counterboring them into the bottom of the board so that they're proud of the surface by only 1-2 mm. I think they'd kind of disappear, they're certainly less obvious than black feet with stainless fasteners.  [big grin]

I like this idea.
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It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Offline JonathanJung

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Re: Quality feet for cutting boards
« Reply #5 on: June 18, 2021, 01:28 AM »
There is a guy in Vermont at a company called High Falls Furniture. He has a Youtube channel and a website called Cuttingboardfeet.com. He has lots of choices, colors, sizes, etc.
I'm not affiliated in any way, just been watching him for years.

His prices seem really high. I emailed him anyway.

Offline JonathanJung

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Re: Quality feet for cutting boards
« Reply #6 on: June 18, 2021, 01:30 AM »
Another thought for those silicone feet I mentioned, I'd consider counterboring them into the bottom of the board so that they're proud of the surface by only 1-2 mm. I think they'd kind of disappear, they're certainly less obvious than black feet with stainless fasteners.  [big grin]

That could be a good look, but I'd have to rethink how I jig up for drilling the holes. I use a jig that references off each corner and has a hole to locate a little drill bit for pre drilling, but I'm not sure if that would work well for counterboring. It needs to be fast.

Offline Bob D.

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Re: Quality feet for cutting boards
« Reply #7 on: June 18, 2021, 05:23 AM »
What about drilling the pilot hole and counterbore in one operation.

Fuller makes countersinks with a flat bottom that might work.

https://www.wlfuller.com/html/Catalog25small.pdf
-----
It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Offline Cheese

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Re: Quality feet for cutting boards
« Reply #8 on: June 18, 2021, 08:01 AM »
What about drilling the pilot hole and counterbore in one operation.

Fuller makes countersinks with a flat bottom that might work.

https://www.wlfuller.com/html/Catalog25small.pdf

Well that's interesting Bob...I forgot about Fuller.  [smile].  They offer the CR13 c'bore that could work well if you want to keep the c'bore as small as possible.  Combine that with a stop collar (page 6) to get easily repeatable depths.



« Last Edit: June 18, 2021, 08:06 AM by Cheese »

Offline Rick Herrick

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Re: Quality feet for cutting boards
« Reply #9 on: June 18, 2021, 08:16 AM »
Good timing.  I just started making a few cutting boards last week.  I ordered the feet below from A*.  Initially they feel good and work great on our countertops.  I had read a few of these type can leave skid marks but I don't believe this set fit in that category.  After reading this thread, and the input from @Cheese , I am really thinking his option is something to look into.  These big ugly black feet don't look near as cool as those clear bumper/plugs.

Cutting board feet

Offline rvieceli

  • Posts: 1489
Re: Quality feet for cutting boards
« Reply #10 on: June 18, 2021, 08:44 AM »
Those feet look interesting. The counterbore seems a bit of over kill. The button on those things is only 3mm high 

Ron

Offline Packard

  • Posts: 533
Re: Quality feet for cutting boards
« Reply #11 on: June 18, 2021, 08:49 AM »
I like Uxcell clear silicone bumpers, they fit snugly in a 5 mm hole. They're small, easily hidden with no fasteners to rust.

I purchase them in bags of 100 but I've seen quantities of 1000 also sold. 

(Attachment Link)
I used the black ones when I was producing pour-over coffee makers.  The black ones were made from rubber and seemed to have a greater anti-slip property (higher coefficient of friction).  I considered that an advantage in that application.  Other than that and the color, little difference.  I don't recall where I bought it though. 

Offline Cheese

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Re: Quality feet for cutting boards
« Reply #12 on: June 18, 2021, 09:15 AM »
Those feet look interesting.

I could see them being a part of your metal working future Ron... [smile]

I use them on wood & I use them on metal. I used them on the dust collection housing I made for the Delta band saw. Two of them are seen on the bottom edge of the DC housing to prevent any noise when this is mounted to the front of the band saw casting.


Offline rvieceli

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Re: Quality feet for cutting boards
« Reply #13 on: June 18, 2021, 09:35 AM »
@Cheese hiw “squishy” are they?

Thanks Ron

Offline Packard

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Re: Quality feet for cutting boards
« Reply #14 on: June 18, 2021, 09:42 AM »
The black ones are fairly hard.  Sort of like a tire tread.  You can easily push your thumbnail into the surface but pressing it with the pad of your finger will not affect it at all.

Offline Cheese

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Re: Quality feet for cutting boards
« Reply #15 on: June 18, 2021, 09:43 AM »
@Cheese hiw “squishy” are they?

Thanks Ron

They're pretty firm Ron, definitely a higher durometer than the typical silicone.

Offline Bob D.

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Re: Quality feet for cutting boards
« Reply #16 on: June 18, 2021, 10:05 AM »
What is the ANSI or ISO standard for 'squishiness', I tried to look it up but drew a blank.  [big grin]
-----
It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Offline Cheese

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Re: Quality feet for cutting boards
« Reply #17 on: June 18, 2021, 10:26 AM »
The durometer of plastics/rubbers is usually measured in Shore hardness.

Offline rvieceli

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Re: Quality feet for cutting boards
« Reply #18 on: June 18, 2021, 10:32 AM »
The durometer of plastics/rubbers is usually measured in Shore hardness.

Is that how far you sink into the sand at the beach?  [wink]

Ron

Offline Packard

  • Posts: 533
Re: Quality feet for cutting boards
« Reply #19 on: June 18, 2021, 10:35 AM »
The durometer of plastics/rubbers is usually measured in Shore hardness.
I would say that the black rubber ones were about 50 on the Shore A scale:

A larger image is in the link.

https://capitalrubber.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/DUROMETER-CHART-CRC.pdf




Offline Bob D.

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Re: Quality feet for cutting boards
« Reply #20 on: June 18, 2021, 12:25 PM »
The durometer of plastics/rubbers is usually measured in Shore hardness.
I would say that the black rubber ones were about 50 on the Shore A scale:

A larger image is in the link.

https://capitalrubber.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/DUROMETER-CHART-CRC.pdf



Could they make it any more confusing please?

Three offset overlapping scales, each ranged from 10 to 100.

Why not just one that runs from 0 (some ultimate squishiness to be determined), to 1000 (whatever you want to designate as the hardest known pliable material of the class). Plenty of room on that scale for everything to coexist.

All the current system does is when someone gives you a durometer number you have to ask "which scale". Leads to confusion and increases the probability of inaccurate interpretation. Reminds me of the NASA/Lockheed screw up with the metric system on the MARS Climate Orbiter back in 1998.
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It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8724
Re: Quality feet for cutting boards
« Reply #21 on: June 18, 2021, 01:00 PM »
Could they make it any more confusing please?

Three offset overlapping scales, each ranged from 10 to 100.

Why not just one that runs from 0 (some ultimate squishiness to be determined), to 1000 (whatever you want to designate as the hardest known pliable material of the class). Plenty of room on that scale for everything to coexist.

All the current system does is when someone gives you a durometer number you have to ask "which scale". Leads to confusion and increases the probability of inaccurate interpretation. Reminds me of the NASA/Lockheed screw up with the metric system on the MARS Climate Orbiter back in 1998.

It's probably left over baggage from the Rockwell hardness standards that were established prior to the Shore "softness" standards. I know there are at least 4 different Rockwell scales...maybe more.

Offline Packard

  • Posts: 533
Re: Quality feet for cutting boards
« Reply #22 on: June 18, 2021, 02:19 PM »
Could they make it any more confusing please?

Three offset overlapping scales, each ranged from 10 to 100.

Why not just one that runs from 0 (some ultimate squishiness to be determined), to 1000 (whatever you want to designate as the hardest known pliable material of the class). Plenty of room on that scale for everything to coexist.

All the current system does is when someone gives you a durometer number you have to ask "which scale". Leads to confusion and increases the probability of inaccurate interpretation. Reminds me of the NASA/Lockheed screw up with the metric system on the MARS Climate Orbiter back in 1998.

It's probably left over baggage from the Rockwell hardness standards that were established prior to the Shore "softness" standards. I know there are at least 4 different Rockwell scales...maybe more.

I posted the image because it represents some degree of reference. 

We have Fahrenheit, Celsius, Kelvin, and Rankine temperature scales.  I think in Fahrenheit for temperature but in Kelvin for color.  Others go through their entire lives without ever thinking of Kelvin temperatures. 

I have to convert to Celsius though I know what 0 and 100 mean.  Rankine means nothing at all to me, though I know it is the equivalent of Kelvin in relation to Fahrenheit. 

The only point is that we need these scales.  We have Mohs scales, Rockwell scales, Brinell and Janko hardness scales. 

In our business, we use Rockwell hardness tests.  We always specify the scale we are using.  Almost always the 'C' scale for our work.  When we harden our tool steel it gets in the 60-65 C range.

Offline Bob D.

  • Posts: 2186
Re: Quality feet for cutting boards
« Reply #23 on: June 18, 2021, 09:41 PM »
I thank you for posting the graphic. First time I had seen the three alongside one another.

It just struck me as unnecessary to have three scales for to measure the same thing.
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It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?