Author Topic: If this was delivered to your shop, what would you make out of it?  (Read 7092 times)

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Offline Peter Halle

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I received this link in an email from Hearne Woods.  It begged the question.

REALLY Big Wood

Peter

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Offline Tinker

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Re: If this was delivered to your shop, what would you make out of it?
« Reply #1 on: February 03, 2013, 10:46 AM »
That is an impressive piece of wood.
BUT, I would NEVER allow any worker or bystander to stand directly under a load being moved as it appears that the help is doing in that operation.
There are too many ways for something to go wrong and for the worker to become flatter than that piece of wood.
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline Alan m

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Re: If this was delivered to your shop, what would you make out of it?
« Reply #2 on: February 03, 2013, 03:02 PM »
how about a cuple of  thousand  pens.
a dining room table
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Offline Sal LiVecchi

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Re: If this was delivered to your shop, what would you make out of it?
« Reply #3 on: February 03, 2013, 03:08 PM »
I am leaning towards a conference room table, I think it would look great set up that way. It is an amazing slab of Walnut

Sal
« Last Edit: February 03, 2013, 05:09 PM by Sal LiVecchi »
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Offline Distinctive Interiors

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Re: If this was delivered to your shop, what would you make out of it?
« Reply #4 on: February 03, 2013, 04:07 PM »
That was the first thing that crossed my mind as well Sal !

Obviously tidied up a bit, but perhaps even leave it in the shape it currently is

Would look superb!!!!!!

Tim.

Offline Sometimewoodworker

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Re: If this was delivered to your shop, what would you make out of it?
« Reply #5 on: February 03, 2013, 08:40 PM »
That is an impressive piece of wood.
BUT, I would NEVER allow any worker or bystander to stand directly under a load being moved as it appears that the help is doing in that operation.
There are too many ways for something to go wrong and for the worker to become flatter than that piece of wood.
Tinker

You missed the fact that he was never under the load in the video that we can see.  if you recheck he was in line with, or behind, the end of the band mill when the wood had to be the other side of it. The only time he might have crossed under the load, and we can't see, is near the end of the shot.

He was rather close to it most of the time and that wasn't the safest place to be.
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Offline Upscale

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Re: If this was delivered to your shop, what would you make out of it?
« Reply #6 on: February 05, 2013, 06:44 AM »
Obviously, some sort of dining table. But, you'd need a pretty big dining room to house it, so I guess a really large house would be in order too. Don't even want to guess what a piece of wood that size sells for.

Offline Kev

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Re: If this was delivered to your shop, what would you make out of it?
« Reply #7 on: February 05, 2013, 07:10 AM »
I would have thought the forklift would have been equipped better to shift timber of that value and majesty - looked like a crude operation to me. Cluttered machinery too.

Sadly I doubt the ultimate owner will appreciate it for it's true beauty. It'll either end up as a board room showpiece or a splash of wood it a ritzy club. I hope I'm wrong though.

Offline Tinker

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Re: If this was delivered to your shop, what would you make out of it?
« Reply #8 on: February 05, 2013, 07:33 AM »
That is an impressive piece of wood.
BUT, I would NEVER allow any worker or bystander to stand directly under a load being moved as it appears that the help is doing in that operation.
There are too many ways for something to go wrong and for the worker to become flatter than that piece of wood.
Tinker

You missed the fact that he was never under the load in the video that we can see.  if you recheck he was in line with, or behind, the end of the band mill when the wood had to be the other side of it. The only time he might have crossed under the load, and we can't see, is near the end of the shot.

He was rather close to it most of the time and that wasn't the safest place to be.
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline woodwrights_corner

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Re: If this was delivered to your shop, what would you make out of it?
« Reply #9 on: February 05, 2013, 09:58 AM »
But Tinker, he had to be close to reach around the one fork and in between the two slabs to place and then retrieve the spacer. ;)

Offline CharlesWilson

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Re: If this was delivered to your shop, what would you make out of it?
« Reply #10 on: February 05, 2013, 10:53 AM »
Inside their sawmill shed, is where they saw the big stuff. They lift the slabs in there with a mighty big vacuum cup. I can think of a dozen ways that the vacuum lifting can go very wrong. I hadn't seen the actual lifting, so they may only do that in order to get the tines of a forklift under the slab.
Charles Wilson

Offline Tinker

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Re: If this was delivered to your shop, what would you make out of it?
« Reply #11 on: February 05, 2013, 01:01 PM »
I have worked under and around heavy equipment for many moons.  I have had to chain heavy rocks and heavy logs in dangerous situations.
That slab was being moved in a very delicate situation with that standing payloader so close to the end of the slab away from the worker.
A slight slight nick of the slab against the machinery and some very unexpected results could occur.  The worker, if you will observe, was howing, what to me, a great deal of inattention to the moving load.  Granted, there was not much space for him to move further away and i am sure he had complete faith in the fork lift operator's abilities.  If i were workin in the same position, i would have been paying a whole lot more attention to the movement of slab and machinery.

When he was placing the piece of wood under the slab for the forks t bet under, the load was only being lifted enough for clearance of the wood and then the forks were moved in further.  The space for the worker to move into was very uneven, but still there was room for him to move.  Whether he could move further or not, you will notice he was NOT really paying very close attention to the load as it was being moved into a space that was very close to being directly over his head.  Even if it was not directly over his head, a nick against the other machine could sent the load sliding.

When I was doing masonry, i often called on a very good friend to bring his machine to my job (where ever it might have been) to help me retrieve or place huge rocks.  I would do the chaining and unchaining and he would operate the machinery.  While i was chaining, he would take his hands completely off of the controls to avoid any unconscious mishaps.  Once chained, the load would not be moved until i was well out of the way for any accident that might just happen.  If the stone was to be placed on a wall, there was an extra guide chain or rope attached so I could be well out of reach should the rock (or log) come lose.  Over the course of 20+ years, the two of us moved many loads with no injury. Even tho we were a team, i never took my eyes off of the load or the track of the load and its relation to me and where i was going to put my feet was of utmost importance.  That young man was somewhat oblivious to both.  The machine operator had a tight squeeze but I would say he was quite capable and perhaps the camera angle made the operation look tighter than in reality it might have been. 
Tinker 
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline Eli

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Re: If this was delivered to your shop, what would you make out of it?
« Reply #12 on: February 05, 2013, 07:01 PM »
As a licensed rigger and variable reach fork operator, I back Tinker 100%. He doesn't need to be that close. Two extra steps backward might give him the advantage if the slab comes off the tines for any reason or there is a hydraulic failure. Something that big it only needs to make partial contact with him to put him out of the game. When he's putting the sticker under the slab, the slab is still resting on the work surface on the close side. Maybe a crushing risk, but not a complete flattening or beheading. He really should have ducked completely under the one tine and stood in the middle instead of putting an arm under it. A hardhat wouldn't hurt. A video like this can attract personal liability fines from Worksafe in Australia.....
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Offline Tinker

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Re: If this was delivered to your shop, what would you make out of it?
« Reply #13 on: February 05, 2013, 09:41 PM »
Eli, I was thinking of the hard hat as well.  I just felt that if what could go wrong, a hard hat would not have done him a bit of good.  Maybe it could have been used to scoop up the pieces.

We have OSHA over here in up-over who love to get into an act like that.  I can just see the fine meter clanking up and up with all of the potential penalties observed.
Tinker

 
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline Eli

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Re: If this was delivered to your shop, what would you make out of it?
« Reply #14 on: February 06, 2013, 04:43 AM »
Most of the time my helmet/hard hat works more like a bumpcap. You'd be amazed how sensitive your head becomes when you aren't smashing it into random things all day. I've seen plenty of people take a shot in a situation where you wouldn't think they'd need a lid and it would have helped heaps. Last time it happened I had to stop the bleeding on someone who had a wrench dropped on their head from two feet overhead. Imagine if it came out of the ceiling. I'm a convert, the only time a helmet doesn't work is when you aren't wearing it. Having said that, I only wear a ball cap if I'm just building. Sometimes a hard lid if framing or roofing.
Do nothing, stay ahead.

Offline Tinker

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Re: If this was delivered to your shop, what would you make out of it?
« Reply #15 on: February 06, 2013, 11:44 AM »
I am a guilty one who almost never wore a hard hat.  One time, when i was wearing mine while cutting trees, one of my helpers tossed a limb towards where i was working and it hit my helmet.  The helmet popped forward onto my nose and I ended up with a welt on my nose, bent glasses and two shiners that looked like i had been in a battle.

My first mason who taught me the trade one time thought it great fun to drop a wad of mortar from high on the scaffolding onto the laborers heads as they passed underneath.  I got a bit angry about such foolishness when he did hit one of the helpers.  I went up the ladder and told him what i thought about such idiocy (I was 17 or 18 and somewhat of a hot head in those days).  I was a little later walking to the latter with a hod full of mortar when the unexpected wad of mortar landed on my skull.  Even tho brick mortar is soft and slightly soupy, when the tiniest amount drops from 20 feet up, it feels like a drill went into my head.  I said nothing and continued my mission to carry the full hod up the ladder to dump into the masons pan.  Somehow, I slipped and landed the full hod on the mason's head.  He got the point.  In those days, nobody wore hard hats.  Now, nearly everybody does.
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Re: If this was delivered to your shop, what would you make out of it?
« Reply #16 on: February 16, 2013, 04:30 PM »
Definitely a dining room table. And I have just the room sized to fit it,  I just have to find time to finish it...... the room, ...and the house.

That being said it would make one heck of a workbench!

Mike
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Offline neeleman

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Re: If this was delivered to your shop, what would you make out of it?
« Reply #17 on: February 17, 2013, 03:14 AM »
How about this one?
Found it on the website of Stu's ShedStu's Shed, a very interesting site.
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