Author Topic: Aircraft lumber - safe to use?  (Read 4539 times)

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Offline HowardH

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Aircraft lumber - safe to use?
« on: July 22, 2012, 05:20 PM »
I sold my jointer this morning (anticipating a A3-31 in a few weeks) to guy who builds out Gulfstream aircraft interiors.  When jobs are done, he takes home loads of high end exotic boards and they are piling up in his garage.  I want to relieve him of such a burden but he mentioned they spray everything with a
FAA approved flame retardent.  Most of it is 4/4 stuff.   I can get it really cheap he told me.   If I run it through a planer, will that remove the retardent or would it be more than likely soaked through the wood?
Howard H
The Dallas Texas Festool Fanatic!

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Offline Dovetail65

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Re: Aircraft lumber - safe to use?
« Reply #1 on: July 22, 2012, 05:33 PM »
Most hardwood exotics do not soak up liquid of any kind very well. I am not sure of what chemical they use,  but in my experience if it is just sprayed on and not soaked you will probably be able plane it off with a 1/8"(probably 1/16" or less)  pass on each side. I would get a little and test it.
The one who says it can't be done should avoid interrupting the person doing it.

Offline Alan m

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Re: Aircraft lumber - safe to use?
« Reply #2 on: July 22, 2012, 06:28 PM »
presumably that 4/4 is rough or they machine it into parts for the aircraft. so i am guessing that it is same to be around while working etc.
i wouldnt use it for food safe items thow.
i would get some and plane it and burn it to see if the flame retardent is still there or not
"A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
- Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

Offline Peter Halle

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Re: Aircraft lumber - safe to use?
« Reply #3 on: July 22, 2012, 09:28 PM »
Unless you are potentially using the wood for food contact surfaces I would doubt that you have to worry about the end result.  Generally you will have a surface finish on it to seal it back in.

I say go for it.  I don't know if you remember Bill Wyko ( one of our members).  He has made some mind blowing humidors and segmented turnings using wood from the aircraft interior left overs / extras/ etc. 

My vote is go for it!

Peter

Offline HowardH

  • Posts: 1186
Re: Aircraft lumber - safe to use?
« Reply #4 on: July 22, 2012, 10:13 PM »
I suppose one can't have too much good exotic wood...
Howard H
The Dallas Texas Festool Fanatic!

Mark Twain:  "I didn't attend the funeral, but I sent a letter approving of it." "If you tell the truth you don't have to remember anything."

mft1080, Trion, MFT/3, T15, OF 1400, RO150FEQ, TS55, RTS400, CT22, CT36E, 800, 1080, 1400, 1900 rails, CSX, C18, Vecturo, Qwas dogs, Parf Dogs, Zobo's, Syslite Uni, CMS GE with router and jig saw plates.  Sawstop contractor.

Offline Mavrik

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Re: Aircraft lumber - safe to use?
« Reply #5 on: July 23, 2012, 01:44 AM »
If it's safe enough to be next to you in an aircraft, it's probably safe enough to be part of your furniture
 [big grin]

Besides ... it's got less chance of bursting into flame too ...
TS55, MFT 1080, PS300, EHL 65, Domino, OF 1010, CTL 22, RO 125, BS75

Offline Kev

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Re: Aircraft lumber - safe to use?
« Reply #6 on: July 23, 2012, 05:39 AM »
I wouldn't consider it food safe regardless of what you do to it, but aside from that I couldn't imagine any serious issue.

I would use fume grade respiration safety when cutting or sanding ... even when using Festools, just to be safe.