Having trouble with your Festool power tool? Well, we're here to help you. Before posting to the forum, give us a chance to diagnose and resolve your issue. In the U.S. and Canada, call us toll-free at 888-337-8600 on Monday-Friday between 8a-5p EST or contact us via email at service@festoolusa.com. For other countries, please visit http://www.festool.com for contact information for your local Festool service department.

Author Topic: router bit question  (Read 11587 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline zapdafish

  • Posts: 606
router bit question
« on: August 04, 2010, 11:10 AM »
http://www.festoolusa.com/products/routers/router-bits/8mm-shank/rail-and-stile-bits/stile-bit-hw-43mm-491129.html

can someone tell me what the dimension for B is? Hoping I can use plywood panelling.

thnx
CT22, TS55, Kapex, RO150, Domino, RS 2 E

Festool USA does not pre-approve the contents of this website nor endorse the application or use of any Festool product in any way other than in the manner described in the Festool Instruction Manual. To reduce the risk of serious injury and/or damage to your Festool product, always read, understand and follow all warnings and instructions in your Festool product's Instruction Manual. Although Festool strives for accuracy in the website material, the website may contain inaccuracies. Festool makes no representations about the accuracy, reliability, completeness or timeliness of the material on this website or about the results to be obtained from using the website. Festool and its affiliates cannot be responsible for improper postings or your reliance on the website's material. Your use of any material contained on this website is entirely at your own risk. The content contained on this site is provided for informational purposes only and does not constitute professional advice.


Offline Festool USA

  • Festool USA Employee
    FOG Administrator
  • *
  • Posts: 8430
    • Festool USA
Re: router bit question
« Reply #1 on: August 04, 2010, 11:14 AM »
D = 43mm
NL = 21mm
B = 5mm



Updated on the website also.

Offline Notorious T.O.D.

  • Posts: 506
Re: router bit question
« Reply #2 on: August 04, 2010, 11:18 AM »
I was thinking that in the US most 1/4" ply is 5.5mm, but I guess you would have to measure what you have.  Baltic Birch may be available in 5mm though...

Best,
Todd

Offline zapdafish

  • Posts: 606
Re: router bit question
« Reply #3 on: August 04, 2010, 11:25 AM »
haha, wow, that was fast thanks

guess I'll need some calipers now too. I don't think I've used 1/4" ply before so not sure if there is much wiggle room in sanding down some of the outer layer to get it to fit.
CT22, TS55, Kapex, RO150, Domino, RS 2 E

Offline Notorious T.O.D.

  • Posts: 506
Re: router bit question
« Reply #4 on: August 04, 2010, 11:36 AM »
Well the other thing if it was too thick for the cutter would be to make one pass on all pieces a bit too high and then lower the cutter a little to make a final pass and get the slot to a workable width.  The cutter also looks like it might work best in a router table of some sort rather than handheld.

Best,
Todd

Offline zapdafish

  • Posts: 606
Re: router bit question
« Reply #5 on: August 04, 2010, 11:43 AM »
not sure if this is the rail or stile side [embarassed] but then wouldnt the other part of the frame have a loose fit?
CT22, TS55, Kapex, RO150, Domino, RS 2 E

Offline Rob-GB

  • Posts: 1101
Re: router bit question
« Reply #6 on: August 04, 2010, 12:56 PM »
not sure if this is the rail or stile side [embarassed] but then wouldnt the other part of the frame have a loose fit?

Following on from Todd's post, all the grooved components would be done as he suggests, so all would marry up, stiles and rails.
The coped & tennoned rail ends where you would use the complimenting router bit would need a spacing washer above or below the guide bearing to get the stub tennon to the correct thickness (often the thickness is determined by the bearing size, so maybe an alternate bearing could be purchased).

Rob.

Offline Ken Nagrod

  • Restricted
  • Posts: 3438
Re: router bit question
« Reply #7 on: August 04, 2010, 01:34 PM »
Todd,

Freud recently told me that the maximum safe router bit diameter for handheld use is 1 3/8 inches or 35mm.  So this bit must be used in a router table for safe operation.

Offline RL

  • Posts: 3040
Re: router bit question
« Reply #8 on: August 04, 2010, 01:52 PM »
Todd,

Freud recently told me that the maximum safe router bit diameter for handheld use is 1 3/8 inches or 35mm.  So this bit must be used in a router table for safe operation.


I think that if you used a larger bearing at the start you could safely use this bit in a hand-held router, obviously with the speed still turned right down. After a few passes, you could switch the bearing for a smaller one and continue routing.

Richard.

Offline Dovetail65

  • Posts: 4619
    • Rose Farm Floor Medallions and Inlays
Re: router bit question
« Reply #9 on: August 04, 2010, 01:56 PM »
I know a guy that uses a 3.5"(actually a bit over 3-3/8") bit in a Festool OF2200 with no issues at all!

I think Freud needs to preface that statement for "use in FREUD routers...".

http://www.festoolusa.com/products/routers/of-2200-eb-router-features-574277.html
« Last Edit: August 04, 2010, 02:01 PM by nickao »
The one who says it can't be done should avoid interrupting the person doing it.

Offline Ken Nagrod

  • Restricted
  • Posts: 3438
Re: router bit question
« Reply #10 on: August 04, 2010, 01:59 PM »
My discussion with Freud actually concerned using their bits in a PC 3 1/4 hp router.

Just because someone gets away with doing something, doesn't make it a safe practice.  If you don't want to follow the company's advice, go for it.
« Last Edit: August 04, 2010, 02:04 PM by Ken Nagrod »

Offline zapdafish

  • Posts: 606
Re: router bit question
« Reply #11 on: August 04, 2010, 02:56 PM »
ah, I would definitely do this in a router table as I think it would require a few passes. The picture might be a bit misleading in the way its shown but it's just there to show the bit and the profile it makes. I anm pretty sure I don't want to try and lower the bit then shim the other rail to get things to fit. I've never seen washers the same thickness in whatever package I got.

CT22, TS55, Kapex, RO150, Domino, RS 2 E

Offline Dovetail65

  • Posts: 4619
    • Rose Farm Floor Medallions and Inlays
Re: router bit question
« Reply #12 on: August 04, 2010, 03:12 PM »
I was commenting on the size of the bit. That type bit is the reason it should be used in a table, as I would use it, not its size.  That was my point.  :)

The one who says it can't be done should avoid interrupting the person doing it.

Offline Notorious T.O.D.

  • Posts: 506
Re: router bit question
« Reply #13 on: August 04, 2010, 04:54 PM »
Making multiple passes to get to the final profile is one of the reasons I prefer my shaper to doing this with a router.  I find it difficult to make multiple passes without getting the profile out of wack somewhere along the line when feeding the stock...unless you have a stock feeder on your router table which in my experience most people don't.  I can cut this in one pass on the shaper with no issues and get a very good resulting profile. Of course with the individual cutters on the shaper it is easier to shim for exact fit too, whether coping or sticking.  Slipping in the collet was another problem that I encountered when trying to do cope and stick with a router back in the '80s.  I think this is much less of a problem now as the collets seem to be much better designed, but cranking down that large washer and nut on the shaper spindle always makes me feel better than wondering in the back of my mind if a router bit is going to slip in the collet.

Too bad the shaper is not embraced by more people on the hobby side of our craft.

1 3/8" bit seems a little small to me for handheld maximum but it also depends on the profile of the bit and the hardness of the wood too I guess.

Best,
Todd