Festool Owners Group

FESTOOL DISCUSSIONS => Ask Festool => Topic started by: Cathey01 on November 29, 2021, 10:45 AM

Title: Connecting Guide Rails together
Post by: Cathey01 on November 29, 2021, 10:45 AM
I currently own an FS 1900/2.  I’d like to expand my capability by adding an FS 1400/2-LR 32.  Are the two guide rails interchangeable.  Can I use the two different rails connected together to make a longer rail?
SC
Title: Re: Connecting Guide Rails together
Post by: SRSemenza on November 29, 2021, 10:53 AM
Hi,

    Welcome to the forum  [smile]

     Yes, they are interchangeable and can be connected using the guide rail connectors.

Seth

Title: Re: Connecting Guide Rails together
Post by: Birdhunter on November 29, 2021, 11:00 AM
There are several connectors available. A search should turn up a number of posts advocating each.
Title: Re: Connecting Guide Rails together
Post by: 4nthony on November 29, 2021, 01:02 PM

I have the Festool connectors and after the first use, noticed the screws dented the rails. I may have tightened them a bit too much, but there are threads here that mention the TSO Connectors (https://tsoproducts.com/accessories/grc-12-self-aligning-guide-rail-connectors/) play much nicer with your rails.
Title: Re: Connecting Guide Rails together
Post by: Paul_HKI on November 29, 2021, 02:30 PM
The latest Festool rail connectors are also a good upgrade on the original type:


https://www.festool.com/accessory/577039---fsv2
Title: Re: Connecting Guide Rails together
Post by: jcrowe1950 on November 29, 2021, 02:57 PM

I have the Festool connectors and after the first use, noticed the screws dented the rails. I may have tightened them a bit too much, but there are threads here that mention the TSO Connectors (https://tsoproducts.com/accessories/grc-12-self-aligning-guide-rail-connectors/) play much nicer with your rails.
   The denting of the rails is caused by too much torque on the screws....that's why Festool used slotted screws because they were simply designed to snug up firmly, not honk down on them....with steel and aluminum interfaces the steel will overcome every time.....TSO has a really nice solution to that issue.
Title: Re: Connecting Guide Rails together
Post by: Packard on November 29, 2021, 03:34 PM

   The denting of the rails is caused by too much torque on the screws....that's why Festool used slotted screws because they were simply designed to snug up firmly, not honk down on them....with steel and aluminum interfaces the steel will overcome every time.....TSO has a really nice solution to that issue.

I recall a friend replacing the "junk" brass split rings that held his camera strap onto his Nikon.  He replaced them with the "much better" stainless steel versions. 

In a few months the stainless steel split rings chewed right through the camera lugs. 

Nikon did address this later on by sleeving the brass camera lugs with stainless steel sleeves.

This image shows the sleeved lugs.  As I recall it cost him $50.00 to replace the lugs back in the late 1960s.  About $400.00 in today's dollars. 

But I would think Phillips head would generate less torque than a slotted head.  I think they chose the slotted head to minimize the use of a screw gun, not to generate less torque.

What would be a "sacrificial" screw for binding to aluminum?  I think making the links with a think strip of stainless steel for the screw to bite into would help. 

I was never much inclined to over tighten.  The screws gripped firmly with just a slight tightening. 



(http://www.pindelski.org/Blog2/Nikon_FE_lug.jpg)
Title: Re: Connecting Guide Rails together
Post by: jcrowe1950 on November 29, 2021, 08:48 PM
But I would think Phillips head would generate less torque than a slotted head.  I think they chose the slotted head to minimize the use of a screw gun, not to generate less torque.

    I am just relaying information from either Greg Paolini or one of the other Festool instructors....the small slotted screws can cam out more easily. As always, YMMV.
Title: Re: Connecting Guide Rails together
Post by: presidentsdad on December 13, 2021, 12:15 AM
I have the TSO rail connectors, I like them.  Very easy to use and don't damage the rails.  One of the keys to connecting the rails is that the ends are not guaranteed square, so leave a small gap between the rails to keep the end from messing up the straightness of the rails. :)
Title: Re: Connecting Guide Rails together
Post by: Rick Herrick on December 13, 2021, 08:29 AM
I have the TSO rail connectors, I like them.  Very easy to use and don't damage the rails.  One of the keys to connecting the rails is that the ends are not guaranteed square, so leave a small gap between the rails to keep the end from messing up the straightness of the rails. :)

Just an addition to this above.  When joining 2 holey rails, make sure that when you set that small gap, ensure you have not lost your 32mm spacing between holes.
Title: Re: Connecting Guide Rails together
Post by: CADru on December 13, 2021, 09:48 AM
But I would think Phillips head would generate less torque than a slotted head.  I think they chose the slotted head to minimize the use of a screw gun, not to generate less torque.

    I am just relaying information from either Greg Paolini or one of the other Festool instructors....the small slotted screws can cam out more easily. As always, YMMV.

FWIW, before switching to the TSO connectors I used to replace the Festool connector stock set screws with SS Nylon-Tip set screws from McMaster-Carr (part# 93285A412). No more dented rail.

https://www.mcmaster.com/catalog/127/3319
Title: Re: Connecting Guide Rails together
Post by: gunnyr on December 13, 2021, 08:36 PM
I use the Festool Connectors.  I did replace the stock set screws with 3mm allen set screws because I never seemed to have a slotted screw driver handy.  Now I keep a 3mm ball end driver in the Systainer for my TS-55 and HKC-55 saws. 

I really don't get the concern about denting or marking the rails.  I simply snug the set screws down and get on with it.  Am I missing something?