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Author Topic: History of the MFT  (Read 1809 times)

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Offline Ross Davis

  • Posts: 42
History of the MFT
« on: June 02, 2022, 11:23 AM »
Hi -

I'm curious about the history of the MFT style top.   I had a look at the Festool site and only saw info on power tools on the Festool History page.

I assume the concept started with holes for bench dogs.  Who developed the concept along to the modern form?

I now see MFT style welding tables - are these a related development?

TIA

Ross

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Offline Bob D.

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Re: History of the MFT
« Reply #1 on: June 02, 2022, 12:20 PM »
"I now see MFT style welding tables - are these a related development?"

I'm not sure how old the welding tables are, but I sure wish they were around 40 years ago (early 80s).

I ran a small bore pipe fab shop on a project for over a year and all the fab tables that were made from sheets of 3/4" plate with 4" pipe legs. Usually had a vise welded on a corner and some attachments for jigs that the guys had come up with. But the grid of dog holes would have great for the pipe spools we were making up which were mostly less than 12 feet long and had multiple fittings at various angles. The dog holes would have been great for making up alignment jigs and jacks to hold branch connections. Most of the spools were 1", 1-1/2", or 2" Sch 40 or 80 316 SS with socketweld fittings and every weld got inspected by the Weld Engineer and NDE (usually a dye check).

I would be interested to know the history of the MFT too. I know there was a model 1080 table (is that the correct model?) that preceded the MFT/3. I think that change came about 10 years ago.
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It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Online afish

  • Posts: 1330
Re: History of the MFT
« Reply #2 on: June 02, 2022, 02:38 PM »
"I now see MFT style welding tables - are these a related development?"

I'm not sure how old the welding tables are, but I sure wish they were around 40 years ago (early 80s).

I ran a small bore pipe fab shop on a project for over a year and all the fab tables that were made from sheets of 3/4" plate with 4" pipe legs. Usually had a vise welded on a corner and some attachments for jigs that the guys had come up with. But the grid of dog holes would have great for the pipe spools we were making up which were mostly less than 12 feet long and had multiple fittings at various angles. The dog holes would have been great for making up alignment jigs and jacks to hold branch connections. Most of the spools were 1", 1-1/2", or 2" Sch 40 or 80 316 SS with socketweld fittings and every weld got inspected by the Weld Engineer and NDE (usually a dye check).

I would be interested to know the history of the MFT too. I know there was a model 1080 table (is that the correct model?) that preceded the MFT/3. I think that change came about 10 years ago.

Not sure but we made our own welding tables back in the day long before I knew about festool MFT this was about 20 years ago we started doing this.  We drilled 3/4 holes and would use some solid bar that was slightly under bent of a L I cant remember for sure but around 75-80° so one leg would drop into the hole and the other tip would make contact first a good wack with a hammer would wedge it into the hole and pinch the part at the tip. Festool wasnt really on my radar at the time so Im not sure which came first 

Offline Bob D.

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Re: History of the MFT
« Reply #3 on: June 02, 2022, 07:15 PM »

Not sure but we made our own welding tables back in the day long before I knew about festool MFT this was about 20 years ago we started doing this.  We drilled 3/4 holes and would use some solid bar that was slightly under bent of a L I cant remember for sure but around 75-80° so one leg would drop into the hole and the other tip would make contact first a good wack with a hammer would wedge it into the hole and pinch the part at the tip. Festool wasnt really on my radar at the time so Im not sure which came first

Yes, we made our own table too. We used a MagDrill to put holes for jigs and supports here and there but no grid of holes like on an MFT. And I had not even heard of Festool back in the 80s.
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It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Offline Ross Davis

  • Posts: 42
Re: History of the MFT
« Reply #4 on: June 03, 2022, 11:32 AM »
« Last Edit: June 03, 2022, 11:34 AM by Ross Davis »

Offline Ross Davis

  • Posts: 42
Re: History of the MFT
« Reply #5 on: June 03, 2022, 11:37 AM »
With plenty of hold down options which look very familiar...


Offline Ross Davis

  • Posts: 42
Re: History of the MFT
« Reply #6 on: June 09, 2022, 12:31 PM »
Bump to see if Festool with reply.

Online Peter Halle

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Re: History of the MFT
« Reply #7 on: June 09, 2022, 07:32 PM »
Bump to see if Festool with reply.

Festool rarely responds on the Forum.  I was watching a video last night and saw reference that the MFT/3 came out in 2008 here in North America.

Peter

Offline Bob D.

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Re: History of the MFT
« Reply #8 on: June 09, 2022, 11:46 PM »
Looks like sometime in 2009 judging by the date on this article.

https://www.woodshopnews.com/tools-machines/festool-rolls-out-new-mft3-workbench

In the 2003-04 Festool Catalog there are the predecessors of the MFT/3.

Wasn't there an index to SysNotes somewhere?

Maybe some clues as to its origin could be found there.
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It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Offline guybo

  • Posts: 387
Re: History of the MFT
« Reply #9 on: June 10, 2022, 04:58 PM »
This look even older than the 1080 or800

Offline Econoline

  • Posts: 35
Re: History of the MFT
« Reply #10 on: June 10, 2022, 05:23 PM »
These welding/fabrication tables have been around since the forties. It would interesting to know the who the inventor/inventors were. I know it wasn't Ron Paulk, and I doubt it was Festool.
E.

Offline leakyroof

  • Posts: 2385
Re: History of the MFT
« Reply #11 on: June 22, 2022, 11:37 AM »
Looks like sometime in 2009 judging by the date on this article.

https://www.woodshopnews.com/tools-machines/festool-rolls-out-new-mft3-workbench

In the 2003-04 Festool Catalog there are the predecessors of the MFT/3.

Wasn't there an index to SysNotes somewhere?

Maybe some clues as to its origin could be found there.
I have the oldy but goody 800.  [smile]   Small top, but very sturdy and doesn't wobble
Not as many Sanders as PA Floor guy.....

Offline tjbnwi

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  • No longer in Cedar Tucky Indiana
Re: History of the MFT
« Reply #12 on: June 22, 2022, 12:29 PM »
In the mid ‘70’s I had a B&D Workmate that had a hole pattern and adjustable jaw.

Tom

Offline Bob D.

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Re: History of the MFT
« Reply #13 on: June 22, 2022, 12:54 PM »
In the mid ‘70’s I had a B&D Workmate that had a hole pattern and adjustable jaw.

Tom

i still have mine. It has 20mm dog holes, they always have since it originated in England. The hole pattern makes no sense though. There are no opposing dog holes IIRC, and the spacing between them varies.
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It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?